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Thread: *Official* Enclosure & Terrarium Picture Thread

  1. #1
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    Default *Official* Enclosure & Terrarium Picture Thread

    Hi all, please read before posting here;

    I thought it would be nice to create a thread composed soley of Enclosure/Terrarium pictures, with a brief specification (for each pic) to include the following:
    • Type, eg Arboreal, Terrestrial etc.
    • Dimensions
    • Substrate & Decor; type/depth etc.
    • Species, for which it is intended
    • Any unique Design Features that you feel are important
    My intention is that this will eventually serve as a 'visual point of reference' for anyone researching how best to house a species, or looking for inspiration etc.

    Try to keep photo's within a reasonable spec, say Dimensions <640x480 and Size <50KB, and provide a link to Full Size if required. If you need any help with the above then please do not hesitate to PM or Email me directly.


    Cheers,
    Adam.

  2. #2
    potnoodle393
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    Hello Adam

    Maybe you could start the ball rolling with all your pics......

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    Ok, so I'll start the 'ball rolling' having just rehoused my juv P.irminia:









    • Type, eg Arboreal, Terrestrial etc.
      Arboreal
    • Dimensions
      Approx. height 12cm diameter 10cm
    • Substrate & Decor; type/depth etc.
      Substrate is exandable 'jungle bed' made from coco fibres, depth approx 2", corkbark for use as shelter and base for webbing.
    • Species, for which it is intended
      P.irminia, juv approx 2 1/4" DLS
    • Any unique Design Features that you feel are important
      Drill holes just below and just above the substrate level to allow for both drainage and ventillation. Also at top of container and lid to allow for good throughflow.


    More to follow when I get chance!!

    Cheers,
    Adam.

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    Ok, here's some more;





    • Type, eg Arboreal, Terrestrial etc.
      Various Slings, oh and some waxworms in there to keep wam.
    • Dimensions
      Taller tubs Approx. height=63mm diameter=48mm for Arboreals,
      Smaller tubs height=48mm diameter=48mm for terrestrial/burrowers, all purchased from thespidershop.co.uk (One container is a spice jar from sainsburys ).

      Enclosure is a general office type box for storage of files etc. and I have a small 5" x 4" heat mat in there. I will be placing some substrate in the bottom of this to help maintain ambient hunidity (I usualy just mist the box).
    • Substrate & Decor; type/depth etc.
      General purpose jungle bed, with orchid bark, mixed with a little vermiculite. Purchased from Faunology.co.uk. Depth for burrowers is about 3cm, arboreals about 1cm.

      Cork bark and/or fake leaves used where required.
    • Species, for which it is intended
      Various; 3 x A.metallicas, 2 x G.Rosea, 2 x E.campestratus
    • Any unique Design Features that you feel are important
      All containers enclosed within one larger one, as it is easier to maintain one lot of temps & humidity than several.

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    Final ones for now;



    • Type, eg Arboreal, Terrestrial etc.
      Both are/were for terrestrial
    • Dimensions
      2 x Small Exo-Terra's, each measuring 30x30x30cm
    • Substrate & Decor; type/depth etc.
      General purpose jungle bed, orchid bark, purchased from Faunology.co.uk. used in the tank on the right - Depth for 'opportunistic' burrower was about 5 - 6 "

      Expandable jungle bed used in tank on the left - for terrestrial, substrate about 2 - 3".

      Cork bark shelters provided for hides, and/or to burrow beneath. Both tanks have water dishes, with a larger one in on the right.
    • Species, for which it is intended
      Left: B.smithi Female, Right: B.albopilosum Male - currently out on breeding loan.
    • Any unique Design Features that you feel are important
      Tanks have been setup beside eachother with identical powered heatmats (12" x 12" rated 12watt), and a thick sheet of polystyrene in between which reflects heat back into the tank to maximise efficiency. Both are hooked up to a single stat and the temp sensor placed in one of them.

      Humidity and ventillation was controlled using pieces of cardboard cut to shape and then covered with foil and clingfilm.


    __________________________________________________ _________






    • Type, eg Arboreal, Terrestrial etc.
      'Semi'-Arboreal.....but she's really more terrestrial :wink:
    • Dimensions
      Tank is a small/medium 'Clear Seal' fishtank measuring approx 45x25x25cm, for which I fashened a lid made from 0.5cm thick black acrylic. Heatmat is fixed to the sie and measures ~28x15cm rated 7watts.

      Inside you can also see a 'shark tank' in which the male currently resides.
    • Substrate & Decor; type/depth etc.
      General purpose jungle bed, with orchid bark, mixed with a little vermiculite. Purchased from Faunology.co.uk. Depth is about 4 - 5cm.

      Inside there is a water dish, a piece of corkbark lent against the side making a nice little shelter which has 2 entrances/exits. She's webbed all inside here so it's like a little grotto.....but she tends to sit outside for 90% of the time. I also put two airplants in there, one of which the root rotted due to being over misted....duh! The other one is alive and well, but she webbed over it.
    • Species, for which it is intended
      C.cyaneopubescens, female
    • Any unique Design Features that you feel are important
      Clingfilm has been used to maintain heat and a bit of humidity to aid breeding. But other than that as mentioned above really.


    Cheers,
    Adam.

  6. #6
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    Setup for B.bohemei, but this is also suitable for pretty much all of the Brachypelma species.

    First a piccy:



    and now the info:

    Type : Terrestrial / opportunistic burrower

    Dimensions : 8"x6" approx

    Substrate & Decor : Coir/Vermiculite mix (70/30 approx) 4" deep, plastic flower pot and some plastic plant to add a bit of greenery

    Species: As stated, this would work for any Brachypelma species really.

    Any unique Design Features that you feel are important :

    Half a plastic plant pot is buried deep into the substrate, then covered over with approx 2" substrate to create a deep burrow.
    Small water bowl to provide fresh water, slight overspill when filling soaks the surrounding substrate to aid a slight increase in humidity but not dramatically.
    Full length ventilation mesh at the back of the tank, to provide good airflow.
    Oh, an the occasional spare cricket just hanging around in case the T gets the midnight munchies!

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    hi all thought i would post some pics of my setups.i find sweet jars and petpals work well plus save a lot of money.

    sub adult/adult terrestrial

    sub adult/adult Arboreal

    juvs Arboreal and terrestrial


    slings/juvs

    any adults that grow over 5"+ i put in big fish tanks

    some setups am working on


    cheers garry

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    finished it of today



    cheers garry

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    More often than not when you purchase a tarantula (especially one of the more exotic species) you will get a spiderling. When choosing a spider it is wise to do some research to find out if you have an arboreal or a terrestrial type. This will determine the type of set up you provide.

    A spiderling under 2 inches in legspan can get all the water they need from a light misting of the webbing and substrate. When bigger it is wise to provide a bottle cap for watering purposes.

    To start off with, here is a small vial used to house a small burrowing spiderling. If you will notice, you will see the burrow the spider has made thru the substrate which is peat moss. The peat moss is deep in order to provide enough substrate for burrowing.


    For a small arboreal spiderling, I just use less substrate. Again I lightly mist the web about once a week for drinking purposes.


    As a spiderling gets over the 2 inch mark, you will need to provide it with a water dish. I almost always use the lid from a 2 liter soda bottle. Here is a typical set up I use for a terrestrial spiderling 2-3 1/2 inches in leg span. Again the substrate is peat moss.


    For a 2+ inch arboreal you will want to use a taller enclosure like the deli cup pictured below. Also note the water cap is hot glued to the side. There is also some wood for the spider to climb on.


    For an adult arboreal I brake out the 1 gallon plastic jars. This is basically the same thing as the last one only on a larger scale.


    For adult non burrowing terrestrials, kritter keepers, 5-10 gallon tanks and big deli cups can be used. An adult tarantula in the wild will usually stay less than 12 inches from their retreat so they dont really need a big enclosure. You might say they are the ultimate couch potato lol


    For an adult burrower, It is much the same way except the substrate is deeper.

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    nice setups i like the stick the cap to the side idea

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    Thanks it works quite well. If you dont keep the cap full of water they will web over it though LOL

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    hmmm i might try it out how does the glue hold up with the heat of the heat mats?

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    I dont use any heat mats so I cant answer that. I know of people that also use super glue as well.

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    Hi Brian, welcome to the forum

    I would imagine some kind of silicoln based adhesive (like the type you can use to fix airplants etc.) should do the trick. Otherwise, how about the trusty old glue gun?

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